Reach out and touch someone

I’ve finally relented and started using Skype for “Internet telephony” or VoIP. I enjoyed using Gizmo, but no-one else seems to be on that system. Skype has more critical mass, but unfortunately doesn’t support open standards like SIP. Nonprofits should really look into Internet telephone technology, which provides free and cheap phone service around the world, for not much hassle. I know Brian has more to say about this, so please visit him to learn more about VoIP’s potential.

In addition to Skype, I have added yet another protocol to the many ways you can contact me. I now have an official i-name. There is a growing movement of people and organizations concerned with how we control and manage our own identities online. This goes way beyond issues of identity theft, although that’s a part of it. One of the more interesting outgrowths of this that I’ve seen is the Attention Trust, who published this manifesto:

You Own:
Yourself
Your data
Your attention

Your Rights:
When you give your attention to sites that adhere to the AttentionTrust, [the following] rights are guaranteed.

Property
You own your attention and can store it wherever you wish. You have CONTROL.

Mobility
You can securely move your attention wherever you want whenever you want to. You have the ability to TRANSFER your attention.

Economy
You can pay attention to whomever you wish and receive value in return. Your attention has WORTH.

Transparency
You can see exactly how your attention is being used. You can DECIDE who you trust.

Generally on this topic, I refer to my friend Kaliya, a.k.a. Identity Woman. Do check her blog out if you’re interested in learning more. The links in her sidebar alone provide a comprehensive education on Internet identity issues.

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