Failed murderer could be free in 12 years

In 2004, Mark Wade Gentry was having a fight with his girlfriend at their home near Hillsborough. “That night it escalated. He admitted he went and got his gun that was loaded. He admitted he threatened her, but he claims he didn’t intend to shoot her” says DA Jim Woodall in the Chapel Hill Herald. But Gentry did pull the phone out of the wall when she tried to call 911, and he was heard (by her 8-year-old son) to say “I’m going to kill you” several times. That doesn’t sound like an accident.

He shot her in the head, and then left her to die – but she didn’t! She “is able to walk with a cane and talk, although she doesn’t remember what happened the night Gentry shot her.” Or maybe she just doesn’t want to motivate him to try to get it right next time.

Does the fact that he he failed in his attempt to murder his girlfriend make it better? Can it explain why he only got a sentence of 13-17 years (minus time already served)? It doesn’t make sense to me. What a scumbag.

5 thoughts on “Failed murderer could be free in 12 years

  1. I agree that domestic violence is EXTREMELY sad. But hurling around pundit style language like “scumbag” only adds fuel to the fire of revenge.

    I know you are against capital punishment and question the racist industrial prison complex… so why would you use rhetoric similar to those who believe all criminals should suffer and die?

    It has always amazed me that in such a Christian dominated nation as the US that so many people forget about forgiveness. Instead people choose to wallow in “An Eye for and Eye”. It’s like the New Testament of the Bible means nothing and that we rather suffer in our hatred.

    Maybe you *should* share more context that led you to write this post…

  2. Brian, I think you make an excellent point. I am opposed to the death penalty, and I also think that more crime could be prevented through seeking compassion and understanding of what motivates people to hurt others. Locking people up and throwing away the key just hardens criminals and doesn’t really help matters. Jail is not the answer to domestic violence just as invading Iraq is not the answer to terrorism.

    I just read that a soldier from Fort Bragg is now in jail for attempting to kill his ex-wife. These are just some of the more obvious examples I have noticed this week. I feel like I see the signs of stereotypical male control and abuse everywhere, from the lives of my loved ones to the government’s militarism. I just can’t stand to see this attitude continue to pervade our lives with no resistance.

    Men don’t suddenly wake up one day and try to kill the women they love. These men have emotional and mental problems… that are rewarded as strengths by part of our society! There are almost always huge warning signs. Why can’t we stop this behavior before people get hurt? How can we teach people (especially men) better ways to communicate and solve problems?

  3. So, I guess you were there that night in 2004 when Gentry had a fight with his girlfriend.

    Do you really know what happened that night? Have you heard his side of the story? I can tell from what you wrote that you are just going on what the media told us, which we know is always true (yes, being a little sarcastic here).

    The comment by Ruby that said, “Men don’t suddenly wake up one day and try to kill the women they love. These men have emotional and mental problems…” is exactly right. Let’s try to help these men instead of pointing fingers and calling them scumbags.

  4. I agree Jane. I do regret the use of the harsh negative tone, when this man deserves our sympathy for what must be serious emotional problems.

    Still it is so upsetting to see the criminal justice system treat domestic violence with a slap on the wrist, which sends the message that these aren’t serious crimes. The government’s general message to the public is that men “own” their women and generally do what they want with their property. Some people still think it’s OK for men to rape their wives!

  5. My name is Ashley Nicole Gentry. I am Mark Wade Gentry’s, first born child. I can not speak for my father but can tell you my side. I care for my father as any daughter would. I just would like for people to remember that Mark has a family and we have to deal with the emotional damage. I had just gave birth to my daughter and spoke with my father’s ex girlfriend. They seemed happy and excited to meet the newest addition to our family. We never know the whole story. There will always be my father’s side, her side, and then the real truth. I am not making excuses for him but we all know things are not always what they seem. I have asked him why and heard his side. I’m just asking for respect as a daughter.

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